Tag Archives: Metallica

Edge Of A Broken Heart: The Runaway Bon Jovi Song

As if Slippery When Wet could have gotten any bigger. Well it COULD have.

 

When we think of 80’s mega albums, Slippery When Wet rubs elbows with Thriller, Purple Rain, Make It BigMadonnaHysteria, Can’t Slow Down, Toto IV, Sports, Born In The U.S.A., and Back In Black.

 

The Bon Jovi Holy Grail spent 8 weeks at #1 (Billboard), 38 weeks within the top 5 albums, became the best selling album in 1987, is among the 100 best selling albums (currently #48) in the United States, and has sold over 12 million copies worldwide.

Richie Sambora’s white Fender Stratocaster

 

Those of us who lived through the New Jersey invasion of the airwaves from Bon Jovi and Bruce Springsteen, remember the 4 singles from Slippery When Wet:

 

You Give Love A Bad Name” (#1)
“Livin’ On A Prayer” (#1)
“Wanted Dead Or Alive” (#7)

 

The above trifecta here gave Slippery When Wet the notable distinction of being the first Glam Metal/Hard Rock album to have 3 top 10 hits. The Hair Metal floodgates opened from there. It was indeed a great time to own stock in Aqua Net.

 

The power ballad, “Never Say Goodbye” was released as the 4th single but not domestically so it wasn’t able the chart on Billboard’s Hot 100.  However it did reach #28 on another chart, the Hot 100 Airplay which measures how often a song is being played on radio stations and more recently streamed online as well.

 

That was the first missed opportunity for another official Bon Jovi single off of Slippery When Wet. The demand was certainly there. The second was “Raise Your Hands”, which was on the soundtrack of the classic 1987 Mel Brooks Star Wars spoof Spaceballsstarring John Candy as Barf, Rick Moranis as Lord Dark Helmet, and a pre Independence Day Bill Pullman as Captain Lone Starr.

 

The movie literally opens up with Bon Jovi. Can anyone picture flying a Winnebago in space without rocking out to “Raise Your Hands?” I mean what the hell did Han and Chewy do on the Millennium Falcon, listen to NPR and knit sweaters? Leave it to a comedy to portray something more accurate,

 

 

But the most egregious lapse in Bon Judgement was not including the amazing track “Edge Of A Broken Heart.” For whatever reason, it missed the tour bus for Slippery When Wet and has been thumbing for a ride in Bon Jovi limbo ever since. It’s a stronger song than many that were included on the album.

 

Slippery When Wet (1986) was the 3rd studio album from Bon Jovi, sandwiched between 7800° Fahrenheit (1985) and New Jersey (1988). It was also the first album they brought in songwriter Desmond Child who co-wrote the album’s 2 biggest tracks “You Give Love A Bad Name” (#1)
“Livin’ On A Prayer” (#1) with Jon and Richie as well as a few others. “Edge Of A Broken Heart” should have been on that list and on the charts.

 

For the longtime Bon Jovi fan or people who just know their songs from the radio, in either case the reaction is the same: WTF?! Why wasn’t this track [“Edge Of A Broken Heart”] released as a single?

 

Slippery When Wet (1986) had 10 songs on it of which 4 were released as singles. For comparison, other albums in this pre-CD era released more songs as singles from their respective albums as shown below:

 

Thriller (Michael Jackson, 1982) 9 tracks 7 singles all becoming top 10 hits, 8 Grammys, best selling album of all time
Can’t Slow Down (Lionel Ritchie, 1983) 8 tracks 5 singles.
Lionel should have released the title track “Can’t Slow Down” as well. It could have been his 6th single.

Back In Black (AC/DC, 1980) 10 tracks 5 singles
Sports (Huey Lewis & The News, 1983) 9 tracks 5 singles
Make It Big (Wham!, 1983) 8 tracks, 4 singles
Purple Rain (Prince, 1984) 9 tracks, 5 singles

Hysteria (Def Leppard, 1987) 12 tracks, 7 singles
Toto IV (Toto, 1982) 10 tracks 4 singles
Born In The U.S.A. (Bruce Springsteen, 1984) 12 tracks, 7 singles all becoming top 10 hits
Madonna (Madonna, 1983) 8 tracks 5 singles
Like A Virgin (Madonna, 1984/85) The 1985 reissue included “Into The Groove”, a track from the 1985 film Desperately Seeking Susan making the album 10 tracks with 6 singles

 




 

“Edge Of A Broken Heart” is chock full of classic Bon Jovi ingredients in their proprietary Jersey Shore stew: David Bryan’s keyboards, Sambora’s crisp crunchy power guitar parts, Jon singing a few long notes during the verses (the words “I’m” and “Now” in both verses of the song) teasing us for the bigger payoff we know he’ll deliver come chorus time.

 

The same kind of vocal hook was used in the verses of “You Give Love A Bad Name”:

Oh, oh, you’re a loaded gun
Oh, oh, there’s nowhere to run

 

This singing device is so Bon Jovi and we drink it up like like bacon flavored Kool-Aid, ready to become drooling rock zombies wearing overpriced tour T-shirts. The nutrition label on this track indeed gives us more than a full days RDA of RAWK—and you’ll still find yourself wanting second helpings of this lost hit.

 

There’s also the “Bon Jovi build” which starts up the song with Tico Torres drums, Sambora’s guitar riff and Bryan’s keyboard work until the band enters in for a full tidal wave of fun smiley 80’s rock before it recedes and gets calm again to let Jon sing about the latest fictionalized Femme fatale that crossed paths with a peaceful tour bus just trying to spread the Gospel of Rock & Roll. The lyrics even mention “Private Dancer” another classic 80’s hit/album from Tina Turner.

 

Then there’s the deluxe call and response vocal parts during the chorus between Jon and the band’s backing vocals giving us a double shot of satisfying volleyball of energy for the ears:

 

Bon Jovi Tickets

 

 

Rock chemists the world over have devised strategic formulas over the years and “Edge Of A Broken Heart” uses a tried and true mixture: The Root, Four, Five chord progression (AKA I IV V)—A classic example  being “Louie, Louie” by The Kingsmen.

 

Another well known chord progression is Root, Five, Four (I V VI) like Baba O’ Riley by The Who better known by as “Teenage Wasteland.”

Chords in Baba O’ Riley:  F  C  Bb  (1 5 4  or I V IV)

Chords in Edge Of A Broken Heart:  E  B  A     E  B  B  C#  A  (1 5 4   1 5 5 6 4  or  I V VI    I V V VI IV)

 

You can see and hear the first part of the chord progression is the same as Baba O’ Riley but just one note lower.

“Edge Of A Broken Heart” is also in the key of E Major like a few other classic rock tunes:

“Limelight” by Rush

“Don’t Stop Believin'” by Journey

 

So Slippery When Wet COULD have had a total of 6 singles released by our count here.




Savvy Glam/Hair Metal fans will know the band Vixen also had a song in 1988 of the same name off their debut album Vixen which peaked at #26 .  This “Edge Of A Broken Heart” was actually written by two other 80’s vocalists/songwriters: Richard Marx and Fee Waybill of The Tubes. Richard Marx actually co–produced the album.

 

As you can see, the #MeToo movement back in the 80’s involved sharing each other’s hair care products as well as song titles:

 

 

But you can’t copyright a title. And Bon Jovi also has song called “Runaway” which Del Shannon had a hit with back in 1961. “Runaway” is one of the “Carpal Tunnel Classics” where there’s Eternal triplet notes for keyboard players like Toto’s “Hold The Line” where a bucket of warm epsom salt is a welcome spa treatment after a gig for your wrist.

 

A fun trivia tidbit here is Steve Vai is married to former Vixen bassist Pia Maiocco (playing the red guitar in the above video). They met at Berklee College of Music in Boston. Richard Marx makes a cameo as well at the 2:41 mark.

 

The Bon Jovi “Edge Of A Broken Heart” was included on the 1987 film Disorderlies starring The Fat Boys who are best known for the single “Wipe Out” (1987) with The Beach Boys doing back up vocals. It was a rap using The Surfaris 1963 hit instrumental of the same name.

 

And speaking of films, there’s an interesting connection with drummer Tico Torres. He was also a studio player for fellow New Jersey band Franke and the Knockouts who are best known for their 1981 hit “Sweetheart” which reached #10.

 

Namesake and lead singer Franke Previte also went on to have a few of his tunes appear in movies like his Bon Jovi brother. Previte is co–writer (along with John DeNicola and Donald Markowitz) of “Hungry Eyes” and “(I’ve Had) The Time Of My Life” which were the anchor tunes on the classic 80’s film Dirty Dancing (1987) with Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey.

 

The original versions were recorded by Franke and the Knockouts but went onto greater acclaim as covers by Eric Carmen (#4 in 1987) and Bill Medley (of The Righteous Brothers) & Jennifer Warnes (#1 in 1987) respectively. The later won an Academy Award, Golden Globe and a Grammy.

 

Looking back, 1986 and 1987 were great years for both New Jersey bands. And here we are some 30 years later coming full circle from when Bon Jovi seemingly took over the world on a steel horse. The funny irony of Slippery When Wet was that it had massive international success with one of the cheapest album covers EVER. Just a step up from Metallica’s The Black Album, where Jon write “Slippery When Wet” on a wet trash bag.

 

So with that, we extend an esteemed “Shock to the Hearty” congratulations to Bon Jovi for making it into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Class of 2018. A photographer I know worked on the New Jersey tour and had nothing but positive things to say about them. It’s always a bonus when people who aren’t a bunch of arrogant egomanics get a deserved honor. Jon is an authentic humanitarian who has his own charity feeding homeless/low income people as well as homeless veterans:

JBJ Soul Kitchen (www.jbjsoulkitchen.org)

Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation (www.jonbonjovisoulfoundation.org)

 

Oh and Jon has stated this lost Bon Jovi tune should have been included on Slippery When Wet and actually apologized believe it or not. So they’ll have to answer for the “Edge Of A Broken Heart” transgression on Bon Judgement Day, but in the meantime, we can forgive them because we’ve found their missing runaway.

© Composer Yoga


Related Posts To Check Out:

Rock Star And Meditation Joke

Hair Metal Heaven: Cinderella “If You Don’t Like It”

Awesome 80s Albums You May Have Overlooked

Closet Singles: Billy Idol “Hole In The Wall”

Sound Mines: The Outfield “Taking My Chances”

Sound Mines: Prince “Mountains”

George Michael: The Careless Whisperer

Closet Singles: The Outfield “New York City”

Yoda’s iPod: “When Doves Cry” By Prince

 

Recommended:

Hair Metal Joke (Hair Metal And Horror Movies)

Hair Metal Joke (Hair Metal Salad)

Prince Joke (Little Red Corvette)

The Prince Prophecy & The Let’s Go Crazy Code




Organifi

IK Multimedia's iRig Keys I/O

Entertainment Earth

Entertainment Earth

Periodic Table Of Rock: Artists

Artists composed of elements and substances from The Periodic Table Of Rock (updated periodically)

Air Supply
Andrew Gold
Billy Ocean
Black Oak Arkansas
Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band
Burning Tree
Copperhead
Curved Air
Diamond Head
Earth
Earth, Wind & Fire
FireHouse
Fleetwood Mac
Freddie Mercury
Frehley's Comet
Golden Earring
Iced Earth
Iron Butterfly
Iron Maiden
Jewel
King Diamond
Krypton
Led Zeppelin
Manfred Mann's Earth Band
Metal Church
Metallica
Midnight Oil
Neil Diamond
Nickelback
Pearl Jam
Pebbles
Plastic Ono Band
Quicksilver Messenger Service
Rare Earth
Scorched Earth
Scorched Earth Policy
Sly And The Family Stone
Steel Panther
Steelheart
Steely Dan
Strontium 90
The Rolling Stones
Tin Machine
Vanilla Ice
Xenon

© Composer Yoga

Entertainment Earth

IK Multimedia's Syntronik




IK Multimedia's iRig Pro I/O

The Colors Of Rock: Songs

A list of songs on the palette making The Colors Of Rock (updated periodically)

18 Yellow Roses (Bobby Darin)
99 Luftballons/Red Balloons (Nena)
All Cats Are Grey (The Cure)
Baby Makes Her Blue Jeans Talk (Dr. Hook)
Back In Black (AC/DC)
Bad, Bad Leroy Brown (Jim Croce)
Big Yellow Taxi (Joni Mitchell)
Black Celebration (Depeche Mode)
Black And Blue (Van Halen)
Black Cat (Janet Jackson)
Black Cow (Steely Dan)
Black Diamond (Kiss)
Black Is Black (Los Bravos)
Black Night (Deep Purple)
Black Water (The Doobie Brothers)
Blue Collar Man (Styx)
Blue Eyes (Elton John)
Blue Eyes Crying In The Rain (Willie Nelson)
Blue Jean (David Bowie)
Blue On Black (Kenny Wayne Shepard)
Blue Suede Shoes (Elvis Presley)
Bluer Than Blue (Michael Johnson)
Brown Eyed Girl (Van Morrison)
Brown Shoes (Frank Zappa)
Brown Sugar (The Rolling Stones)
Caribbean Blue (Enya)
Crystal Blue Persuasion (Tommy James & The Shondells)
Colour My World (Chicago)
Desert Rose (Eric Johnson)
Don't Eat the Yellow Snow (Frank Zappa)
Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue (Crystal Gayle)
Fade to Black (Metallica)
Goodbye Yellow Brick Road (Elton John)
Green Earrings (Steely Dan)
Green Eyed Lady (Sugarloaf)
Green Green Grass Of Home (Johnny Darrell, Porter Wagoner, Bobby Bare, Tom Jones)
Green Light (Lorde)
Green Onions (Booker T. & The M.G.s)
Green Tinted Sixties Mind (Mr. Big)
Gold (John Stewart)
Golden Lady (Stevie Wonder)
Golden Slumbers (The Beatles)
Lady In Red (Chris Deburgh)
I Saw Red (Warrant)
Indigo Eyes (Peter Murphy)
It's Not Easy Being Green (Kermit the Frog)
Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini (Brian Hyland)
Little Red Corvette (Prince)
Mellow Yellow (Donovan)
Men In Black (Will Smith)
Midnight Blue (Lou Graham)
Mr. Brownstone (Guns N' Roses)
Orange Crush (R.E.M.)
Paint It Black (The Rolling Stones)
Pink Cadillac (Bruce Springsteen, Natalie Cole)
Pink Houses (John Cougar Mellencamp)
Purple Haze (The Jimi Hendrix Experience)
Purple People Eater (Sheb Wooley)
Purple Rain (Prince)
Red Barchetta (Rush)
Red House (The Jimi Hendrix Experience)
Red Sector A (Rush)
Red Skies (The Fixx)
Song Sung Blue (Neil Diamond)
Tie A Yellow Ribbon Round The Old Oak Tree (Tony Orlando and Dawn)
Touch Of Grey (The Grateful Dead)
True Blue (Madonna)
True Colors (Cyndi Lauper, Phil Collins)
Still Got The Blues (Gary Moore)
White Rabbit (Jefferson Airplane)
White Room (Cream)
Yellow (Coldplay)
Yellow Flicker Beat (Lorde)
Yellow Submarine (The Beatles)

© Composer Yoga

The best tasting superfoods greens powder available! Organic • Paleo • Raw • Gluten & Soy Free • Vegan. No juicing or blending required.




Foodstirs, Inc

VenueKings.com

It’s Not the Chorus! (Where The Song Title Is Not The Chorus)

A list of songs whose title (or part of it) is sung in the lyrics but not in the chorus (updated periodically)

867–5309/Jenny [Tommy Tutone, you dialed it–admit it!]
Atlanta Lady (Something About Your Love) [Marty Balin]
Baker Street [Gerry Rafferty]
Careless Whisper [George Michael]
Dreams [Fleetwood Mac]
Escape [Metallica]
Foolish Beat [Debbie Gibson]
I.G.Y. (What A Beautiful World) [Donald Fagen]
Major Tom (Coming Home) [Peter Schilling]
Phantom Of The Opera [Iron Maiden]
Red Barchetta [Rush]
The Trooper [Iron Maiden]
Tom Sawyer [Rush]

 

© Composer Yoga

Entertainment Earth




Ghost Title Songs

Ghost Title Songs: Where the title is NOWHERE to be found lyrically and nebulously floating in the ether (updated periodically)

5150 (Van Halen)
A Sort Of Homecoming (U2)
Baba O'Riley (The Who)
Long Train Runnin' (The Doobie Brothers)
Ride The Lightning (Metallica)
She Sells Sanctuary (The Cult)
Texas Flood (Stevie Ray Vaughn)
The Clairvoyant (Iron Maiden)
The Trooper (Iron Maiden)
Witch Hunt (Rush)

© Composer Yoga

IK Multimedia's iRig Acoustic Stage

VenueKings.com




Closet Singles: Bihlman Bros. “American Son”

Question: Why wasn’t this tune all over the radio? “American Son” is an INSTANT classic rock anthem. I knew it the first time I heard it. It’s all there—all the ingredients—the edgy bust your ass lyrics, funk styled bass and groove, brutal brass knuckles blues riffs, piston punching pre chorus, and nasty chainsaw wielding chorus. It’s just plain badass. There’s SO much great music out there it’s criminal that tracks like the Bihlman Bros. “American Son” don’t scale the white picket fence of musical mediocrity that often passes for top 40. By contrast, this track is a bellicose ballet on barbed wire.

 

“American Son” is uptempo take no prisoners power blues at it’s finest. Jabo Bihlman’s vocals are ballsy, lionesque, delightfully masculine. There’s depth and a musical quality to the wails and howls making it a raucous rodeo of melodic belligerence—and you ride that bull right out of the gate kicking and snorting. You’d better bring balloons to your cowboy hat at the ICU.

 

The intro riff is a slutty black fishnet wearing hook that you just can help starring at. And I mean that in the best possible way. The build up is the sound of a python ready to strike, slinky and uncoiling:

It’s a great open road tune that could ride shotgun with Steppenwolf’s “Born To Be Wild.” I weightlift and exercise to this song as well. It’s in my workout mix along with tunes from Slayer, Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, Metallica, Megadeth, Henry Rollins (Rollins Band), Shadows Fall, etc. So for a band to be in there that’s NOT actually considered Metal, says something about the energy and intensity fermenting within this tune. It’s an unapologetic tornado of testosterone. I wouldn’t brush my teeth to it if I were you.

 

“American Son” is a track off their 2006 release also titled American Son. The Bihlman bros. are a Northern Michigan based power blues rock outfit consisting of Jabo (Jeff) Bilhman on guitar and vocals and Scot (Little) Bihlman on drums and backing vocals. Not little as in Gimli (Lord of the Rings), little as in younger brother. Both are alums of the famed Musicians Institute (MI) in Hollywood. Scot Bihlman is also an actor on the side. Here he is in the Burger King “Simpsonize Me” commercial a few years back. Scot is seated on a bench then morphs in Otto, the heroic headphone wearing headbanging school bus driver of Springfield:

The Bihlman Bros. have toured Europe and they also play in a band with Kings X frontman Doug Pinnick called Grinder Blues (remember the King’s X tune “It’s Love” off of their 1990 album Faith Hope Love?). They also won an Emmy for the soundtrack on the 2009 film Love N’ Dancing which starred everyone’s favorite Titanic villain Billy Zane along with Amy Smart and Tom Malloy. Seven tracks from Their 2009 album What U Want were featured in the film.

 

The breakdown from 2:46–3:28 on “American Son” is where Jabo and Scot get all quiet and you think you’re safe from the impending stampede of sonic bombardment. It’s a loaded freight train in the distance building up steam only to drown you in it’s deafening Doppler wave.

 

But you just know they’re going to build and kick you in the nuts again with the riff and still you’re defenselessly asking them please do so. It’s like a Fraternity you want to join to willingly get tarred and feathered like that initiation scene in the college comedy classic Revenge of The Nerds. You will endure the humiliation and beg until the Bihlman Bros. bring it again with the riff. It’s musical S&M of the highest degree. You will lick the Bihlman Bros. black leather boots…

Music Video for “American Son” (Union Street Station in Traverse City, MI):

 

Okay maybe I’m getting a little carried away here. “American Son” is such a rocking mix of kinky belligerence like a fine Joe Walsh riff, a guy who always plays straight from the hip. It feels a bit like The Eagles “Life in the Fast Lane” riff but sounds like you’d rather to drive a battle tank to it—over a sportscar. Are you with me so far? “American Son” could have been written in the 70’s, 80’s or 90’s—it doesn’t matter. It’s a timeless and dateless anthem existing in that eternal jukebox in the sky. A sky with way more than 50 stars for everybody to enjoy the underlying current of this song’s collective primal freedom.

© Composer Yoga

Related Posts To Check Out:
Sound Mines: Bihlman Bros. “Dream”




Hair Metal Heaven: Cinderella “If You Don’t Like It”




VenueKings.com

Ah, one of my favorite deep cuts of Hair Metal. This is Hair Metal having a bad hair day. This is Hair Metal Sweeney Todd would rock out to while practicing his horrific handiwork. If you've only heard Tom Keifer wail away on Cinderella singles released to radio, you'll be pleasantly pleased with this ear shattering escapade in E mixolydian. "If You Don't Like It" delivers bluesy banshee riffs with Tom's trademark sonic screams galloping on an uptempo iron horse.

 

"If You Don't Like It" is a track off Cinderella's sophomore album Long Cold Winter released in 1988. Long Cold Winter reached #10 on the charts and went double platinum by year's end. The album produced the Hair Metal classic "Gypsy Road" and the power ballad "Don't Know What You Got (Till It's Gone)" which holds as the highest charting single for Cinderella reaching the #12 slot. Long Cold Winter also included the singles "The Last Mile" and "Coming Home" which just edged in the top 20. "If You Don't Like It" is a fun FU song in the tradition of The Eagle's "Already Gone", Billy Joel's "My Life", and Metallica's "Escape." Tom Keifer carried this grand gospel of youthful declaration of independence to Hair Metal.

 

I don't need anyone
To tell me how to run my life
Got along alright so far
I don't really think I need to hear your advice
I've got my mind made up know what I wanna do
I'll do it anyway I choose
So just sit back shut up for a minute let me show you what I'm gonna do

 

Funny how a band name like Cinderella began in a location not exactly red carpet velvet rope glass slipper territory. Guitarist Tom Keifer and bassist Eric Brittingham met in a bar bathroom on Halloween in 1980. There's an "I Just Knew" tale that could stack up to the best of those relationship and wedding story TV shows. Actually Keifer and Brittingham had also revolved through the same Philadelphia area band Saints In Hell earlier.

 

We can't talk about Cinderella without mentioning fellow brotherly love band Britny Fox. Britney Fox was formed by 2 former Cinderella members: Guitarist Michael Kelly Smith and drummer Tony Destra. It's a Hair Metal fairy tale of the birth of 2 bands like Metallica and Megadeth minus the some kind of soap opera monster of drug abuse that always upstages people's lives.

 

Just over 2 hours outside Philly in Mechanicsburg, yet another 80's Hair Metal band was cutting their chops on nightclub stages before relocating to L.A.: Poison. Across the state line just south of the PA border in nearby Hagerstown, Maryland, Kix was blowing fuses in the club circuit. This general area was at the crosshairs of the east coast Hair Metal invasion. A decade earlier, the Philly area sprouted some Hall & Oates, who became one of the most successful duos of all time. Afterwards acts out of the Philly area that achieved prominence were R&B/Soul/New Jack Swing group Boyz II Men and Trance Fusion/Jam band the Disco Biscuits.

Kobo Inc.




O'Neill, La Jolla Group

There's several vocalists in the Hair Metal Howler club I get my regular guilty pleasure fix along with Tom Keifer: "Dizzy" Dean Davidson of Britny Fox and Steve Whiteman from Kix. They continue the vocal styling of 70's rock bands like AC/DC, Aerosmith, and Nazareth which Tom Keifer could easily go back and time and fill in on a gig for Dan McCafferty singing "Hair Of The Dog" and only Dan's mom would probably notice.

 

"Nobody's Fool" firmly established Cinderella in the subgenre of pissed off maverick glam as their flagship song from their debut album Night Songs which reached the #13 position. The noble tradition continued on Long Cold Winter with "If You Don't Like It":

 

Take it to your heart gonna tell ya from the start
Gonna send a word or two your way
So just sit back take a ride on your pony
It'll all come back to you one day

 

There's so many cool parts to this tune: The strummed chords in the intro and overlaying spacious atmospheric whammy bar work, the main riff which becomes the bedrock for the chorus, the pulsating driving rhythm in verse like a steaming locomotive loaded with boxcars of boiling beratement, the slinky blues based snub your nose dalliance of the prechorus. There's even a Jon Bon Jovi sighting at the end of this clip if that's not enough:

As to Cinderella, the band had more in common with her maid rags as the preferred "Royal Ball" stage fashion during the 1980's than fairy tale footwear. Tom Keifer prefers wearing snakeskin boots when strolling down Gypsy Roads anyway, and if you don't like it, he's gone on record here on the probability of a care package arriving during a Long Cold Winter in Hell.

© Composer Yoga

SwimOutlet.com




SecondSpin.comSoltrader Outlet

Sound Mines: Prince “Mountains”

If you’re a fan of the classic Prince sound congealed with his backing band The Revolution, you’ll definitely appreciate this lesser known track off the Parade album.

 

Released in 1986, Parade was the 8th studio album by Prince and also the final one with The Revolution. Tracks like “Mountains” are prized audio real estate since his passing for fans to nostalgically travel back in time to the 1980’s on a purple motorcycle.

 

“Mountains” starts off with the familiar Linn LM–1 drum machine used in several earlier Prince hits like “1999” and “When Doves Cry.” This drum machine was also used by other artists in the early 80’s as it popped up on Billy Idol albums as well—Say for instance, if you’re going to be dancing with yourself, you’ll probably need a drum machine.

 

“Mountains” was written by Wendy & Lisa with Prince which demonstrates just how much The Revolution was the integral formula that produced the classic 80’s Prince sound which reached it’s commercial peak with Purple Rain.

 

Prince’s earlier solo records didn’t have the same “real world” orchestration as when he was backed by The Revolution. Being a multi–instrumentalist although impressive, it’s still ALL YOU playing every instrument and this can be perceived by other musicians and astute listeners. Having other musicians play and collaborate with adds an additive synergy one person cannot create by themselves alone.

 

Case in point, Steely Dan could have recorded everything (keys, bass, guitars) by Walter Becker & Donald Fagen and used an electronic drum machine. Instead they hired the best A–list studio musicians in the business which made all their albums sound all the more varied than if the two did everything by themselves. That’s how one band can turn into and sound like a handful of bands with the same 2 core members.

 

Thankfully Prince realized this after a few solo albums as well. That he could still record all by himself in his home studio and also with a band. Each has it’s pros and cons but having both puts more globs of color on a artist’s creative palette. Then there’s the blatant reality that if your’re going to play out and perform live, you cannot just be a studio band—you’ll have to have an actual band so you might as well have a group of other musicians to bounce ideas off.

 

Another thing is you can only overdub yourself so many times before it becomes overkill and listeners want to hear another biological entity vocalizing something—like that chimpanzee in the beginning of Michael Jackson’s “Off The Wall” for instance.

 

Outside of Freddie Mercury and Brad Delp of Boston, there’s not too many singers that still sound cool nuanced and interesting overdubbed 20 times. Having two or more vocalists creates tension and resolution within a song and having male and female vocalists adds another layer to the audio onion. Prince nailed this concept on “1999”; If only one vocalist sung the entire song it wouldn’t have had the same impact and appeal. There’s not too many songs like “1999” that use 3 vocalists to split the verses.




“Mountains” only reached the #23 slot on the US Billboard charts, but it’s definitely a buried track in Prince’s catalog that deserves greater recognition. The earlier single released from the Parade album “Kiss” became more popular having become a #1 hit. However, I prefer the groove and mood of “Mountains” as it has more emotional depth and introspection than “Kiss.” It holds up better for me during repeated listenings and on replay which helps to “get inside the song” and integrate a song into your life.

 

“Mountains” is a “sister synth” song to “1999” and “I Would Die 4 U.” It uses the same Prince falsetto we all know and love as in “Kiss” but it’s a more seriously toned falsetto instead of a “playful south enough of lecherous” for AM radio one. “Mountains” is the track where Prince unleashes his full array of vocal tricks. It has the trademark Prince Wooo!! like on “Let’s Go Crazy”, the Owww!, and the Purple Banshee Screams like on “When Does Cry”:

 

Lollapalooza Tickets


Guitars and drums on the 1 Huuuh!!!

“Mountains” is my favorite song off the Parade album and the track I listen to most frequently in several of my iPod mixes. Plus I always dug the lyric “Once upon a time in a haystack of despair” in the song’s second verse. It evokes a cool jagged image where I wonder why any metal band hasn’t jumped on writing a song called “Haystack Of Despair.” If there’s a “Harvester Of Sorrow” according to Metallica, then it follows logically there should damn well be a “Haystack Of Despair” right? Nuff said.

 

“Kiss”, with it’s stylized falsetto, is like a hybrid pop/novelty song—it’s like Prince walked the fence between those two genres on that track, which isn’t surprising as he was never the poster boy for musical purists. He lived to experiment in the Paisley Park fire pit and create new sound stews. And besides, blind obedience to purism and “genre parameters” makes for a lower ceiling on Creativity. And that leads to starvation like what’s whispered towards the end of “Mountains” before the fade out. If there’s Diamonds And Pearls and Gold Experience in them there hills, my ear definitely hears some Purple Rain in them “Mountains.”

© Composer Yoga


Related Posts To Check Out:
The Prince Prophecy & The Let’s Go Crazy Code
Prince Joke (Little Red Corvette)
Yoda’s iPod: “When Doves Cry” By Prince
First Recording Of Purple Rain In America
Talking To Your Bandmates During The Song Vol. 1

Recommended:
Sound Mines: Bihlman Bros: “Dream”




IK Multimedia's Syntronik